Scientists Engineer Air Filter that Can Kill SARS-CoV-2 Instantly

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Scientists from the University of Houston, in collaboration with others, have engineered an air filter that can entice SARS-CoV-2 and kill it immediately. The filter is produced from commercially obtainable nickel foam heated to 200 levels Centigrade (392 levels Fahrenheit).

RELATED: HIGH PERFORMANCE AIR FILTERS MIGHT NOT LIVE UP TO EXPECTATIONS

Virus exams on the Galveston National Laboratory discovered that 99.8% of the SARS-CoV-2 virus was killed in a single move and that 99.9% of the anthrax spores have been additionally killed.

“This filter could be useful in airports and in airplanes, in office buildings, schools, and cruise ships to stop the spread of COVID-19,” stated Ren, MD Anderson Chair Professor of Physics at the University of Houston and the co-corresponding writer for the paper.

“Its ability to help control the spread of the virus could be very useful for society.” 

The researchers stated that for the reason that virus can stay in the air for about three hours, making a filter that might take away it from the air was essential. The researchers additionally knew the virus couldn’t survive temperatures above 70 levels Centigrade (158 levels Fahrenheit).

As such, they determined to create a heated filter and make the filter temperature far hotter in an effort to kill the virus nearly immediately. They used nickel foam for the air filter as a result of it’s porous, electrically conductive, and versatile.

The researchers encountered one drawback: nickel foam has low resistivity. To resolve that concern, they folded the froth, connecting a number of compartments with electrical wires to extend the resistance excessive sufficient to boost the temperature as excessive as 250 levels Centigrade (482 levels Fahrenheit).

“By making the filter electrically heated, relatively than heating it from an exterior supply, the researchers stated they minimized the quantity of warmth that escaped from the filter, permitting air conditioning to operate with minimal pressure,” stated a press launch from the University of Houston. 

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